A Resilient Livestock Journey

With loans from VisionFund Myanmar, Ohnmar was able to build five new concrete sties to replace her old wooden pigsty, allowing her to raise more pigs and increase the family income.

Ohnmar (46) is a determined and hardworking woman who dreams of expanding her livestock business to provide a better life for her family. Together with her husband Aung Aung (47) and youngest son Yuri (15), they live in Kyee Pin Inn village, nestled in the scenic Gyo Hpyu Village Tract in Taikkyi Township. Their three other sons are now grown up, with the two older ones living and working as garment factory workers in Jordan. The family relies on their livestock and tricycle rental business for their livelihood.

VisionFund Myanmar staff visited her village to promote their financial services and when she saw that VisionFund Myanmar’s interest rate was better than the village money lenders, she immediately took out a loan. She was also pleased that VisionFund Myanmar works closely with World Vision, who years ago supported their youngest son through their child sponsorship programme.

Daw Ohnmar Pyone

 

“I started my journey with VisionFund Myanmar in 2018, with a first loan of 550,000 MMK (US$262). Through the years and with loans from VisionFund Myanmar, my small wooden pigsty which can only accommodate 2-3 pigs has now grown into five concrete pigsties which can house more than 10 pigs each. I also bought a tricycle which my husband uses for ferrying people and goods, which adds to our income. I earn about 1,000,000 to 1,500,000 MMK ($475-715) in four months from the livestock business and about 10,000 to 15,000 MMK ($4.75-7.15) daily from the tricycle rental. I am now on my seventh loan cycle with VisionFund Myanmar, and I continue to find ways to expand and grow our business.”

With the additional income, Onhmar managed to repair their house: replaced the thatched roof with a zinc roof, floors and walls are now concrete, and fixed and upgraded their washroom and water pump. Most importantly, the steady income ensures the children can attend and finish school.

While their town was relatively unaffected during the pandemic, the past two years have been challenging for Ohnmar’s livestock business as swine fever hit the area, resulting to many swine deaths. Ohnmar listened to experts advise on swine fever prevention. Her niece who was staying with them at that time also shared some lessons she had learned from a WV livestock training she has attended. As a result, Ohnmar didn’t lose any of her pigs, while many around her lost most or all of their pigs.

Thankfully, the daily income from tricycle rental business was a big help during this time. The family has learned to diversify their income and can see the impact that diversification has made on their livelihood.